Will of the People: The Mathematics of How We Vote and Why It Matters

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Will of the People: The Mathematics of How We Vote and Why It Matters

 11 Jun 2024
1800 GMT RESERVE A SPOT HERE

Symposium Building, Surgeons Quarter 12 Hill Square, Edinburgh EH8 9DR

The Panel

  • John Curtice, University of Strathclyde
  • Moon Duchin, Tufts University
  • Eric Maskin, Harvard University

The Chair

  • Alma Steingart, Columbia University

About:

In 2024 elections are expected in sixty-four countries*, as well as the EU. Almost half of the world’s population will have the opportunity to vote. In the fast-moving, non-stop news feed world we occupy, access to opinions - true or false, good or bad, real or AI generated - about who to vote for is inescapable. There will be countless televised debates and millions of words spoken and written to try and influence your decision on polling day. But what about the mechanisms behind voting? Voting systems are mathematical in nature, so can we enact political change by following mathematical evidence of what methods work better than others?

Please join us on 11 June at 18.00 at the Symposium Building, Surgeons Quarter to hear a stellar panel give their informed perspectives on how voting systems affect elections outcomes. There will be a moderated discussion and an opportunity for the audience to ask questions.

The Panel

John Curtice is a professor of politics at the University of Strathclyde, and a senior research fellow at the National Centre of Social Research. Professor Curtice is a ubiquitous presence in the UK media around the time of any election with his particular expertise in exit poll estimation.

Moon Duchin is a professor of mathematics and the John Dibiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service at Tufts University. She is a founder of the Metric Geometry and Gerrymandering Group, bringing techniques from mathematics to the study of fair redistricting. She has served as an expert witness in many high-profile gerrymandering cases.

Eric Maskin is the Adams University Professor and professor of economics and mathematics at Harvard University . He has made contributions to game theory, contract theory, social choice theory, political economy, and other areas of economics. Eric Maskin was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2007 (with L Hurwicz and R Myerson).

The Chair

Alma Steingart, Department of History, Columbia University