Addressing statistical challenges of modern technological advances

ICMS, Bayes Centre, 47 Potterrow, Edinburgh EH8 9BT

24 - 28 June 2019

Organisers



Steve Buckland, University of St Andrews

Ruth King, University of Edinburgh

Rachel McCrea, University of Kent

Byron Morgan, University of Kent

Ken Newman, BioSS and University of Edinburgh


Technological advances in collecting ecological data have expanded rapidly in the last few years, and at a significantly faster rate than the associated and necessary statistical tools for analysing the data to obtain inference on the ecosystems under study. The availability of cheap technological devices suitable to collect the data has led to an explosion of new forms of data; quality of data (e.g. finer temporal/spatial resolution); and quantity of data. Each of these aspects provide new statistical challenges. Specific examples of the new forms or increased quality/quantity of data available include (but are not limited to): advanced geolocation tags; motion/acoustic detector trap arrays; and citizen science data. These lead to a mathematical demand for new statistical methodology that can take full account of the strengths and limitations of the data generated. Challenges that arise with these forms of data that need to be addressed include, for example, developing new finer resolution models (and continuous time/space models); accounting for interactions at both the individual and species level; dealing with computationally intensive likelihoods (and/or big data); dealing with different forms of missing (correlated) data; and efficient model-fitting tools. In addition to the individual challenges raised by the new data available, it is common for multiple different types of datasets be collected on the same ecosystem, leading to further challenges in integrating such data from different sources (of differing quality). However, the potential pay-off for being able to combine different forms of data, often of varying quality and quantity, has huge, and as yet largely untapped, potential.

The workshop programme focuses on these emerging forms of data and the new statistical models and associated model-fitting tools for analysing such data. This will include identifying the key issues that need to be addressed and discussing new potential approaches. The workshop will also provide a platform for identifying new avenues related to the main statistical challenges for modern statistical ecology, build new collaborations and provide the opportunity to explore new interdisciplinary areas.

There will be a Public Lecture on Tuesday 25th June given by Prof. Stephen Buckland, University of St Andrews.

Arrangements

Speakers invitations to this workshop were issued by ICMS in February 2019.

The public application is now closed.

ICMS does NOT use third parties to arrange accommodation.  If you are approached by a third party (e.g. Business Travel Management) asking for booking details, please ignore.  If you have any concerns please contact ICMS.

 

Programme

 

Monday 24 June 2019


11:00-12:20

Registration with coffee

12:20-13:20

Lunch

13:20-13:30

Welcome and opening remarks

13:30-14:30

Illian, Janine (University of St Andrews)
In a world of many processes — what’s the point?

14:30 –14:50

Discussion

14:50-15:20

Coffee/Tea in the catering space

15:20-17:00

Workshop

17:00-18:00

Informal wine reception in catering space

 

Tuesday 25 June 2019

09:15-10:15

Bonner, Simon (University of Western Ontario)            
Accounting for Identification Uncertainty with Non-invasive Marks

10:15-10:30

Discussion

10:30-11:00

Coffee/Tea in the catering space

11:00-11:20

Butler, Adam (BIOSS)
Understanding the spatial distribution of seabirds: integrating information from multiple data sources

11:20-11:40

Cole, Diana (University of Kent)
Inference with parameter redundant models: reparameterisation, constraints, robust design and integrated models 

11:40-12:00

Boersch-Supan, Philip (BTO)
Avian population trend estimation from semi-structured citizen science data

12:00-12:20

Blackwell, Paul (University of Sheffield)
Continuous-time Hidden Markov Models for Animal Movement

12:20-13:30

Lunch

13:30 –14:30

Parton, Alison (University of Sheffield)             
An ABC framework for parameterising physiologically structured population models.

14:30-14:50

Discussion

14:50-15:20

Coffee/Tea in the catering space

15:20-15:40

Besbeas, Takis (Athens University of Economics and Business)               
Modelling population dynamics using hidden Markov models  

15:40-16:00

Camp, Richard (University of St Andrews)                    
Comparison of uncertainties from advanced modelling methods to improve abundance precision

16:00-16:20

Seaton, Andy (University of St Andrews)                      
Demystifying the SPDE approach to spatial modelling

16:20-16:40

Jimenez, Marina (University of Kent)               
State-space models for census data with small counts

16:40-17:00

Glennie, Richard (University of St Andrews)                 
Incorporating point process and occupancy modelling of citizen science multispecies records

18:00-19:00

Public Lecture
Buckland, Steve (University of St Andrews)                  
Monitoring biodiversity: problems and solutions

 

Wednesday 26 June 2019


09:15-10:15

Langrock, Roland (Bielefeld University)                                                          
Hidden Markov models in ecology: ever more complex?   

10:15-10:30

Discussion

10:30-11:00

Coffee/Tea in the catering space

11:00-11:20

Spence, Michael (CEFAS)
Sustainable fishing in a multi-species world

11:20-11:40

Sarzo, Blanca (Universitat de València)
Are big problems solved with large databases? The use of integrated models to correct partial monitoring problem in Ecology.

11:40-12:00

Souza, Julio (University of Kent)
Beef Cattle predation by Jaguar (Panthera onca) on the Pantanal Region, Brazil

12:00-12:20

Franchini, Filippo (University of St Andrews)
Aerial Digital Acoustic Surveys of Gibbons

12:20-13:30

Lunch

13:30 –14:30

Matechou, Eleni (University of Kent)               
Modelling environmental DNA data

14:30-14:50

Discussion

14:50-15:20

Coffee/Tea in the catering space

15:20-15:40

Van Dam-Bates, Paul (University of St Andrews)                      
Call Density of Morepork in New Zealand using Cluster Capture-Recapture

15:40-16:00

Frost, Fay (University of Sheffield)                    
Modelling the Collective Movement of Reindeer

16:00-16:20

Milner, Jordan (University of Sheffield)            
Modelling and Inference for the Movement of Interacting Individuals

16:20-16:40

King, Ruth (University of Edinburgh)                
Big (data) Trouble in Little Charadriiformes

16:40-17:00

Newman, Ken (BIOSS and University of Edinburgh)      
A Hierarchical State-Space Model for Animal Population Dynamics Given Data for Multiple Life Stages

 

Thursday 27 June 2019 


09:15-10:15

Dennis, Emily (Butterfly Conservation)             
 If the insects go, then we go                                              

10:15-10:30

Discussion

10:30-11:00

Coffee/Tea in the catering space

11:00-11:20

Morgan, Byron (University of Kent)
Occupancy models for large bodies of citizen science presence data

11:20-11:40

Barry, Jon (CEFAS)
European seafloor litter assessment

11:40-12:00

Borger, Luca (Swansea University)
New statistical models for animal biologging data

12:00-12:20

Oedekoven, Cornelia (University of St Andrews)
Mark recapture distance sampling – new opportunities for visual and acoustic platforms using recent advances in technology and software

12:20-13:30

Lunch

13:30 –14:30

McCrea, Rachel (University of Kent)                 
Dynamic models for batch mark data: A case study of Mantella

14:30-14:50

Discussion

14:50-15:20

Coffee/Tea in the catering space

15:20-15:40

Fell, Christina (University of St Andrews)                      
Automated detection of animals in aerial surveys

15:40-16:00

Worthington, Hannah (University of St Andrews)                    
Capture-Recapture-Recovery Models with Semi-Markov Survival

16:00-16:20

Naumann, Ulrike (University of Kent)
Modelling changes in abundance of Telfair skinks over space and time

16:20-16:40

Stevenson, Ben (University of Auckland)                      
Cluster capture-recapture to account for identification uncertainty on aerial surveys of animal populations

16:40-17:00

Michelot, Theo (University of Sheffield)
The Langevin diffusion as a model of animal movement and habitat selection

19.00

Workshop dinner at Blonde Restaurant, 71-75 St. Leonard's St, Edinburgh EH8 9QR



Friday 28 June 2019

09.30-09:50

Smout, Sophie (University of St Andrews)
Predators: finding the restaurant and chosing from the menu

09:50-10.10

Photopoulou, Theoni (University of St Andrews)
Studying the effects of ocean properties on the diving ecology of Weddell Seals using hidden Markov models

10.10-10.30

Durbach, Ian (University of St Andrews)
Modelling behavioural responses of minke whales to sonar activity during navy training

10.30-11.00

Coffee/Tea in the catering space

11.00-12:00

Borchers, David (University of St Andrews)      
Don't forget the time

12:00-12:20

Closing Remarks

12.20-13.30

Lunch provided in the catering space

13.30

Close of Workshop

 

Invited Speakers

Simon Bonner, University of Western Ontario
David Borchers, University of St Andrews
Stephen Buckland, University of St Andrews
Emily Dennis, Butterfly Conservation
Janine Illian, University of St Andrews
Roland Langrock, Bielefeld University
Eleni Matechou, University of Kent
Alison Parton, University of Sheffield