Entrance hall of the ICMS Workshop

Maxwell Institute Colloquium on Modelling, Mathematics, and Computation of Complex Multiscale Systems

Jul 02, 2014

Edinburgh

Organizers:
Ben Goddard (University of Edinburgh) and
Markus Schmuck (Heriot-Watt University)

PLEASE NOTE THIS COLLOQUIUM WILL BE HELD AT 14 INDIA STREET, EDINBURGH, EH3 6EZ

Complex Multiscale Systems (CMS) play a crucial and wide-ranging role in daily life; examples include many chemical and biological processes, mechanical and electrical properties of materials, and many modern technologies such as micro- and nano-fluidic systems, batteries, fuel cells, and genetic analysis. A general problem of CMS is that they represent high dimensional computational problems which (a) are beyond  most standard computational methods and (b) when tractable often show unfavourable effects such as oscillations, finite time blow-up or unphysical solutions such as negative densities. Often, available macroscale models are not sufficiently accurate whilst the corresponding microscale models are too inefficient and/or result in excessively large amounts of data. Computational approaches attempt to combine these two viewpoints in the hope of achieving a reasonable compromise between accuracy and efficiency.

Further information is available at http://www.maths.ed.ac.uk/~bgoddard/events.html

 

Main Speaker

Prof. Weinan E currently holds positions at the Department of Mathematics and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton  University, and at the Beijing International Center for Mathematical  Research at Peking University. Previous to this, he held a professorship  at the Courant Institute, New York University. He is recognised as a  world-leader in a wide range of areas of applied and interdisciplinary  mathematics, including multiscale modelling, density functional theory  for electronic structure analysis, the theory and modelling of rare  events with applications in chemistry and material sciences, stochastic  partial differential equations, and the mathematical theory of solids,  from atomic to macroscopic scales.

He has published over 150 scientific  papers and, in 2011, a book on the 'Principles of Multiscale Modeling' (CUP). Amongst a number of awards and honours, he received the Feng Kang Prize in Scientific Computing (1999), the ICIAM Collatz Prize (2003) and the Ralph E. Kleinman Prize (2009). He was elected as a fellow of  Institute of Physics (2005), a fellow of SIAM (2009), a member of the  Chinese Academy of Sciences (2011), and a fellow of the American  Mathematical Society (2012).

This workshop is supported by the Maxwell Institute,  NAIS (Centre of Numerical Algorithms and Intelligent Software), and by CANPDE (Centre for Analysis and Nonlinear PDEs)

 

Arrangements

Venue

Maxwell's Birthplace, 14 India Street, Edinburgh

 

Accommodation/Finances

 - Invited Speakers: accommodation will be arranged by ICMS and full details will be emailed nearer the time of the workshop. Travel reimbursement details will be confirmed via email.

 - Other Participants: there is limited funding to assist with travel/accommodation for early career researchers.  Should you wish to apply for this, please complete the relevant section in the registration/application form.

 Participation

 To request a place at this workshop please complete the Registration/Application Form. (Please note: Speakers will be sent links  to a separate registration form)

Programme

Confirmed speakers

  • Weinan E, Princeton University
  • Gero Friesecke, TU Munich
  • Ping Lin, University of Dundee
  • Lucia Scardia, University of Glasgow

 

The event will be organized as a one-day workshop as follows:

10.45-11.00

Welcome

11.00-12.00

Weinan E (Princeton University)
Progresses and challenges in multiscale modeling.

12.00-13.30

Lunch

13.30-14.30

Lucia Scardia (University of Glasgow )
Homogenization of dislocations dynamics

14.30-15.00

Coffee Break

15.00-16.00

Ping Lin (University of Dundee)
Error estimates for quasi-continuum methods with simple or complex lattice structures.

16.00-16.30

Coffee Break

16.30-17.30

Gero Friesecke (TU Munich )
Does the electronic Schrödinger equation explain the chemical behaviour of atoms and molecules? A tale of hidden scales.

Participants

Name Institution
Antal, Tibor University of Edinburgh
Bajars, Janis University of Edinburgh
Branicki, Michal University of Edinburgh
Corson, Lindsey University of Strathclyde
Doster, Florian Institute of Petroleum Engineering
Dreher, Michael Heriot-Watt University
Escher, Susanne Heriot-Watt University
Friesecke, Gero TU Munich
Gang, Tie Qiang Xiamen University
Gimperlein, Heiko Heriot-Watt University
Goddard, Ben University of Edinburgh
Knops, Robin Heriot-Watt University
Le Pense, Solenn Heriot-Watt University
Lin, Ping University of Dundee
Lord, Gabriel Heriot-Watt University
MacNeil, Michael University of Edinburgh
Popovic, Nikola University of Edinburgh
Scardia, Lucia University of Bath
Schmuck, Markus Heriot-Watt University
Shang, Xiaocheng University of Edinburgh
Thomas, Philipp School of Mathematics
Vanneste, Jacques U of Edinburgh
WEI, NANXIN University of Edinburgh
Wilson, Stephen University of Starthclyde