Study Group on Mathematics in Energy Systems

Innovate UK’s Knowledge Transfer Network and ICMS are running a 3-day Study Group on Mathematics in Energy Systems. This will be held 5-7 December 2018 at ICMS, Edinburgh

This three day session will be an intense problem solving activity with some of Britain’s best mathematical scientists tackling some of the hardest problems in the energy systems industry. We would want to attract problems across the energy systems piece - from storage, network supply, integration etc.

This will be the second Study Group on Energy Systems, the first was held in early 2018 at the University of Sussex and addressed problems in electric vehicle battery degradation, determining real time power systems inertia in the grid and issuing efficient instructions for national grid management.

The Problems: We are finalising the details of each problems to be addressed at this meeting. We expect 4+ problems from large and small organisations ranging from marine traffic optimisation, power generation including renewable, energy systems engineering and energy efficiency requiring the best minds in control, fluid dynamics, operational research and others.

Further details about each problem, and the study group arrangements are provided the document, available here.

Challenge OneA Curious Fluid Resonance in a Sloped Channel on a Wave Energy Converter
Company: Mocean Energy
Presenter: Cameron McNatt
Description: 

Mocean Energy is an Edinburgh-based company developing a wave energy converter (WEC), which converters energy in ocean waves into electricity. The dynamics of the system is complex, including multiple, coupled degrees-of-freedom and frequency-dependent forces. We believe that the optimisation has stumbled upon a phenomenon caused by the wave channels that creates a wave resonance, which may (or may not) be trapped mode. We would like a linear mathematical model that is relevant to our conditions.

Challenge Two: A Marine Propulsion Control System Holy Grail or Maths?
Company: DuoDrive Ltd.
Presenter: John Carter
Description: Duodrive is interested in novel marine propulsion systems which will provide variable speed drive and allow optimised matching of the engine output. The design will allow diesels to operate at a fixed speed in their optimum zone, independent of the demanded propulsion speed. Duodrive is aware that key to this will be the control system, and without a robust methodology it will be impossible to figure if empirical design will result in the ideal result. Duodrive wishes to explore the optimum control system by creating a virtual model of the drive-train.

Challenge ThreeIncreasing Maritime Efficiency Through The Application Of Analytically Enhance Predictive Planned Maintenance
Company: V.Ships
Presenter: Adrian Box, Jacqui Gilbert
Description:

V.Group is the leading global provider of Maritime Support Services. Our database covers all aspects of vessel operational and technical management, such as routes sailed, crew information, purchasing spend and suppliers, maintenance schedules, observations and history - stretching back decades.
The Maritime industry has for many years carried out the majority of its maintenance activities based on a traditional combination of manufacturer’s guidelines and time based maintenance interventions. More recently, Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) has been introduced; however, this has not been as widely or extensively adopted as originally envisaged. There are a considerable number of barriers to wider adoption of CBM within the Maritime industry, not least the limited understanding and articulation of the opportunity that CBM represents. Leaders in the industry are already looking beyond CBM towards Predicative Planned Maintenance (PPM). We believe that there are significant and real tangible advantages for British Industry to be at the forefront of Maritime PPM creating a value chain around equipment quality rather than low initial cost with hidden high in service life time costs. Arguably however the real value is in efficiency, be it the cost of operation, time lost during unnecessary interventions or cost of unexpected failure.

The aim of this Study Group challenge is to objectively determine the effectiveness of current pump maintenance routines and based upon these experiences; seek to both predict future interventions (maintenance) and map meantime between failures – in essence the basis of a predictive maintenance algorithm.

Challenge FourMathematical Language and Sequential Bundling of Demand-Response Contracts Under Uncertainty
Company: Upside Energy Ltd
Presenter: Sergio Elizonda-Gonzles, Graham Oakes, Steve Wattam
Description:

Upside Energy Ltd. Provides balancing services to the UK National Grid using a diverse portfolio of electricity assets.  These assets are owned by partners and are controlled by Upside’s platform according to service agreements, such as response times, power magnitudes, rates of change, cost structure etc.  These conditions are stated into a Demand-Response (DR), which is interpreted as an option for Upside to use for balancing services.

However, these contracts (or offers) might expire frequently and the set of conditions might vary often depending on the asset owner circumstances.  For instance, a DR offer may be expressed as “use 1MWh of battery X for charging and discharging operations from 00:00 to 05:00 hrs for the next 2 days at 10GBP / MWh”,  Since these DR opportunities might become available at short notice, the first part of this challenge is to develop a language in which partners (asset owners) can write their own contracts which allows mathematical reasoning (e.g. formal verification).

Reliability of DR contracts might vary and they are usually bundled to satisfy a given service level.  The second part of this challenge is find an optimal bundling of DR offers, similar to a multistage stochastic unit commitment problem.

Challenge FivePlanning Edinburgh City Infrastructure for Uptake of Electric Vehicles
Company: Edinburgh City Council
Presenter: 
Description:

The city of Edinburgh has ambitious plans for increasing uptake of electric vehicles, in order to improve air quality and reduce carbon emissions. This requires infrastructure developments, including provision of charging points and electricity network capacity, and also taking advantage of synergies with local renewable generation. Availability of energy supply in turn influences the delivery of residential and commercial development. Planning background uncertainties include rate of uptake of vehicles, technology growth, and the spatial development of the city itself. The group will scope approaches to these issues, and council analysts will provide data on planning background projections and be available for discussion of uncertainty in these.

 

Wednesday 5 December 2018

09:30-1000

Registration

10:00 - 11.15

Welcome, Introduction and Problem Presentations

(ICMS Lecture Theatre, level 5)

11.15-11.45

Coffee Break

11.45-13.00

Group Work

13.00-14.00

Lunch

14.00-15.30

Group Work

15.30-16.00

Coffee Break

16.00-17.30

Group Work

17:30-18:15

Welcome drinks reception

18.30

Evening Meal, Blonde Restuarant

 

Thursday 6 December 2018

09:00-11.00

Group Working

11.00-11.30

Coffee Break

11.30.13.00

Group Work

13.00-14.00

Lunch

14.00-15.30

Group Work

15.30-16.00

Coffee Break

16.00-17.30

Group Work

17:30-18:15

Pizza/Beer Reception - ICMS

 

Friday 7 December 2018

09:00-11.00

Group Working

11.00-11.30

Coffee Break

11.30.13.00

Group Work

13.00-14.00

Lunch

14.00-15.30

Final Presentations

15.30-16.00

Coffee Break

 

Why take part in the Study Group?

Academics:

Get new problems
Expand research portfolio
Vital contact with industry
Meeting academics from different fields

Industry:

Get new solutions
Access to highly qualifies individuals
Written report

Arrangements

Accommodation:  There is funding to cover accommodation for a number of participants.  Please complete the relevant section of the registration form if you wish to apply for funded accommodation

Travel:  It is anticipated participants will cover their own travel costs.  However, if this is a barrier to your participation please contact Dawn Wasley (dawn.wasley@icms.org.uk)

Registration Fee:  The registration fee for this event is £35.  You will be send instructions regarding payment of this fee post completion of the registration form.

The registration form is available here

Please note, this registration indicates your interest to attend, it is not a guarantee a place will be available for you. The organisers reserve the right to allocate places best suited to the problems being presented. Please also note, that by using the form above, your information will be shared with the Knowledge Transfer Network. 

If you have any questions, please get in touch with Dawn Wasley (dawn.wasley@icms.org.uk)